Feelin’ Groovy with Regular Groomin’

 

The skin is the largest organ of the human body—also of our furry companions’ bodies. Skin serves as a barrier to the environment, acting as a channel for communication to the outside world, and helping to regulate metabolism.
   
Most common disorders in cats and dogs involve their skin and coat: hot and bare patches, feline acne, dull-looking fur, rashes, scratching, shedding, bad odors, dandruff, greasy textures, matting and tangles. These problems are caused by a number of factors, including accumulation of toxins in the body.
   
We erroneously believe that Fluffy grooming herself several times a day and Fido running through the water at the beach or getting spritzed by a hose weekly takes care of the task. Regular brushing stimulates the lymph system, which improves circulation. It prevents tangling and pulls the natural oils through the coat. Long-haired cats and dogs require more attention than their short-haired relatives but all pets benefit with daily brushings. Using a loofa sponge or rough dry washcloth massages the body to open pores and smooth the coat. A spray of chamomile tea after brushing removes dander and body odors.
  
Shandra Collins, professional pet groomer and owner of Shandra’s Pet Salon in Naples, Florida grooms many of her furry clients weekly, especially the older and heavier pets who are unable physically to groom their entire bodies. Collins states, “Our furry friends feel better with regular baths and grooming. Cats and dogs are made of two-thirds water and it’s important to rejuvenate their skin with clean water. I recommend bathing dogs monthly, outdoor cats at least two times a year and indoor cats quarterly. Daily brushing is a big help and a great way to continue bonding with your pet.”

by Betty Borsukoff

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Last modified 2005-10-28 03:29 PM

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